Umberto’s Clam House

Come here for clams or scallops, and don’t mention what happened here in 1972… Location: 132 Mulberry Street, between Grand and Hester Streets in Little Italy Umberto Ianniello, the original owner, recognizing the dearth of Italian seafood restaurants in Little Italy, decided to open his own establishment. The restaurant, with its unpretentious atmosphere and flavorful…

NYC Bars Mobile App

NYC Bars: Guide to Speakeasies and Historic Bars mobile app Click here to download Delve into the intriguing history of secret speakeasies and bars with NYC Bars: Guide to Speakeasies and Historic Bars! New York has a fascinating story to tell. To discover it, a museum visit isn’t always necessary… try going to a bar instead! Step back…

William Barnacle Tavern

William Barnacle Tavern 80 St Marks Pl A divey, unpretentious pub specializing in absinthe – a high-proof grain alcohol made with anise, fennel, and wormwood with a strong black licorice essence. The tavern dates as far back as the 1830s. During the Prohibition, it was owned by Frank Hoffman, a Bavarian-born well-connected bootlegger whose friends…

The Palm Court

The Palm Court 768 5th Ave at 58th St, inside The Plaza Hotel This spectacular room, with its soaring stained-glass roof, transports you to the times of old-world elegance. It was once said, “Nothing unimportant ever happens at The Plaza.” When The Plaza opened its doors in 1907, it was advertised as the Greatest Hotel…

The Boathouse (Loeb Boathouse)

THE BOATHOUSE (LOEB BOATHOUSE) East 72nd St in Central Park As one of the most romantic places in New York to have a drink or rent a boat, the Boathouse has been enjoyed by New Yorkers since the 1870s. The Zagat review says it all: “It’s all about the ‘unbeatable location’ at this lakeside American…

The Blue Bar at Algonquin

The Blue Bar at Algonquin 59 West 44th St between 5th and 6th Ave A literary landmark made known by the “Vicious Circle,” this is one of the most civilized and elegant places to have a conversation over a superb cocktail. The Algonquin gained notoriety when it became a regular meeting spot for the best literary…

Oyster Bar

OYSTER BAR Inside Grand Central Terminal, 89 E 42nd St A New York institution serving oysters since 1913. As you enter the room, the first thing you’ll notice is the cave-like multi-arched ceiling laid with interlocking terracotta tiles. They were created by Rafael Guastavino, whose brickwork can also be found in the Municipal Building, at…

McSorley’s Old Ale House

McSorley’s Old Ale House 15 East 7th St “Be Good or Be Gone” since 1854. Established in 1854, McSorley’s Old Ale House claims to be the oldest saloon in New York. Pretty much everything is the way it used to be: the furniture, the bar, the old stove, the walls covered with memorabilia, and the…

21 Club

21 Club 21 West 52nd St Guarded by lawn jockeys on the balcony above its entrance, 21 Club is an iconic New York restaurant which started as a Prohibition-Era speakeasy. The 21 Club is a “jacket required, jeans not permitted” kind of place with a very expensive menu and an intimidating list of regulars. The…

The Back Room

The Back Room 102 Norfolk St In the 1920s it was the headquarters of Murder, Inc., deadly Italian-Jewish Mafia headed by Meyer Lansky and Lucky Luciano. The Back Room is not your average speakeasy-themed bar – it functioned as an actual speakeasy that secretly operated at the back of Ratner’s kosher restaurant. Ratner’s, a vegetarian…