Employees Only

EMPLOYEES ONLY 510 Hudson St Exquisite cocktails and delectable food in a sensual Art Deco atmosphere. Even though Employees Only is a modern-day speakeasy (it opened in 2004), the building it occupies dates to 1827. Initially, it was intended as a simple residential structure for working-class families. As it changed hands, the ground floor was…

Death and Company

Death and Company 433 East 6th St A small sit-only cocktail bar hidden in plain sight on a quiet residential street. Death & Co. has no windows and allows no natural light. The space is dark and mysterious, suggesting the secrecy of a speakeasy. Its physical feel is meant to convey permanence and fool you…

Dear Irving

DEAR IRVING 55 Irving Pl Inspired by Woody Allen’s movie Midnight in Paris, the bar features four rooms representing four different eras in history. The room closest to the entrance represents the 1960s, where you can imagine Don Draper-types drinking their martinis. The F. Scott Fitzgerald room has the Great Gatsby feel of the Roaring…

Campbell Apartment

Campbell Apartment 15 Vanderbilt Ave Glamorous and luxurious, this hidden bar was once the private office of railroad tycoon John W. Campbell. The opulent office of railroad tycoon John W. Campbell, measuring 60-feet long, 30-feet wide, and 25-feet high, was one of the largest ground floor spaces in the city at the time. It was…

Bar Centrale

BAR CENTRALE 324 West 46th St A well-hidden spot in the middle of the Theater District. Located in the middle of the touristy Theater District, Bar Centrale masquerades itself as a typical 19th century residential New York brownstone. The place is quiet and intimate, decorated with black-and-white photographs of famous actors and musicians. Bar Centrale…

Attaboy

ATTABOY 134 Eldridge St The original modern-day speakeasy. Attaboy feels like a speakeasy. There is no phone, no website, and no reservations. You enter as if you would be entering an apartment. Attaboy occupies the space of Milk & Honey, the original modern-day speakeasy opened in 1999 by the legendary bartender Sasha Petraske. According to…

Apotheke

APOTHEKE 9 Doyers St An apothecary-themed cocktail bar inside of a former opium den. Unexpectedly decadent, this lounge is inspired by European apothecaries and 19th-century Parisian absinthe dens. Dim lighting, Parisian-looking furniture, a gilded ceiling, and an imposing marble bar create a truly old-world feel. Since ancient times it was widely believed that alcohol possessed…

Angel’s Share

Angel’s Share 8 Stuyvesant St One of the oldest modern-day speakeasies, it is the most tranquil one, featuring some of the most exotic cocktails in the city. Angel’s Share is a true modern-day speakeasy. It has no website, does not accept reservations, tolerates no loud voices, has no standing room, and is closed to groups of…

21 Club

21 West 52nd St Guarded by lawn jockeys on the balcony above its entrance, 21 Club is an iconic New York restaurant which started as a Prohibition-Era speakeasy. The 21 Club is a “jacket required, jeans not permitted” kind of place with a very expensive menu and an intimidating list of regulars. The assigned celebrity…

1986 Est. Wine Bar & Lounge

1986 EST. WINE BAR & LOUNGE 43 West 32nd St Intimate low-key piano bar buried inside of a drab hotel in Korea Town. Est. 1986 is Koreatown’s best-kept secret. This intimate, classy spot is buried inside of the dingy Hotel Stanford on 32nd Street. The space is dimly lit, and the decor is understated and…

The Back Room

The Back Room 102 Norfolk St In the 1920s it was the headquarters of Murder, Inc., deadly Italian-Jewish Mafia headed by Meyer Lansky and Lucky Luciano. The Back Room is not your average speakeasy-themed bar – it functioned as an actual speakeasy that secretly operated at the back of Ratner’s kosher restaurant. Ratner’s, a vegetarian…

Chumley’s

Chumley’s 86 Bedford St Once a celebrated literary speakeasy, whose patrons defined 20th-century American literature, it is now an upscale restaurant. All one has to do is to find the entrance. Don’t be surprised if you don’t see a Chumley’s door sign. There never was one… A flaming radical, Lee Chumley came to New York…