The Boathouse (Loeb Boathouse)

THE BOATHOUSE (LOEB BOATHOUSE) East 72nd St in Central Park As one of the most romantic places in New York to have a drink or rent a boat, the Boathouse has been enjoyed by New Yorkers since the 1870s. The Zagat review says it all: “It’s all about the ‘unbeatable location’ at this lakeside American…

The Blue Bar at India House

The Blue Bar at India House 1 Hanover Square A hidden bar inside a private club. The Blue Bar is named for its brilliantly-blue color scheme. With oversized neoclassical windows, it feels like an elegant, bright 19th century New York living room. India House, a New York City landmark, was constructed shortly after the fire…

The Blue Bar at Algonquin

The Blue Bar at Algonquin 59 West 44th St between 5th and 6th Ave A literary landmark made known by the “Vicious Circle,” this is one of the most civilized and elegant places to have a conversation over a superb cocktail. The Algonquin gained notoriety when it became a regular meeting spot for the best literary…

Slowly Shirley

Slowly Shirley 121 West 10th St This is a 1940s-era Hollywood-themed bar hidden beneath… another bar. This subterranean speakeasy features inventive but expensive cocktails, art-deco decor, an intimate dark atmosphere and 1940s Hollywood’s Golden Age sensibility. The cocktail menu is quite a good read, with very unusual names, some of which sound like Hollywood movie…

Oyster Bar

OYSTER BAR Inside Grand Central Terminal, 89 E 42nd St A New York institution serving oysters since 1913. As you enter the room, the first thing you’ll notice is the cave-like multi-arched ceiling laid with interlocking terracotta tiles. They were created by Rafael Guastavino, whose brickwork can also be found in the Municipal Building, at…

Mulberry Project

Mulberry Project 149 Mulberry St The home of bespoke cocktails. Unlike most other cocktail places, Mulberry Project is not a speakeasy, but a lounge, with very loud music, and the atmosphere one would not call classy. Mulberry Project specializes in the concept of bespoke cocktails. A regular cocktail menu exists, but it’s much more interesting…

Middle Branch

Middle Branch 154 East 33rd St Prohibition-era cocktails in a two-story Murray Hill townhouse. Even though Middle Branch is not as hard to find as Sasha Petraske’s other establishments, such as Milk & Honey (now closed) or Little Branch, it maintains the main traits of the perfect cocktail bar: the well-crafted cocktail and the classy…

McSorley’s Old Ale House

McSorley’s Old Ale House 15 East 7th St “Be Good or Be Gone” since 1854. Established in 1854, McSorley’s Old Ale House claims to be the oldest saloon in New York. Pretty much everything is the way it used to be: the furniture, the bar, the old stove, the walls covered with memorabilia, and the…

Manhattan Cricket Club

MANHATTAN CRICKET CLUB 226 West 79th St This club is inspired by colonial gentlemen’s clubs that were prominent throughout the British Empire at the turn of the 20th century. The Club pays homage to the clubs in the British Empire which served as places where proper gentlemen could enjoy a civilized conversation over a perfect…

Little Branch

Little Branch 22 7th Ave South A speakeasy, hidden in the basement of a nondescript building in the West Village. Little Branch is one of the early pioneers of the speakeasy scene. This underground space is small, dimly lit, intimate, and often features live jazz. It’s the place for serious cocktail connoisseurs. After all, Little Branch…

Fig. 19

FIG. 19 131 ½ Chrystie St A dim spot tucked behind an art gallery on the Lower East Side. Fig. 19 is located on an unattractive and dark stretch of Chrystie Street. The doorway is plain and would be easy to miss if it weren’t for a bouncer. Before entering the bar, you step into…

Death and Company

Death and Company 433 East 6th St A small sit-only cocktail bar hidden in plain sight on a quiet residential street. Death & Co. has no windows and allows no natural light. The space is dark and mysterious, suggesting the secrecy of a speakeasy. Its physical feel is meant to convey permanence and fool you…